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Didaskalia : The Journal for Ancient Performance

http://www.didaskalia.net/

“Didaskalia is an English-language, online publication about the performance of Greek and Roman drama, dance, and music.  We publish double blind, peer-reviewed scholarship on performance as well as reviews of the professional activity of artists and scholars who work on ancient drama.

We welcome submissions on any aspect of the field, and we provide a uniquely friendly venue for publishing sound, image, and video evidence.  If you would like your work to be reviewed, please write to editor@didaskalia.net at least three weeks in advance of the performance date.  We also seek interviews with practitioners and opinion pieces.”– From the website.

Literary Criticism Online

http://www.literaryhistory.com/

One of the New York Public Library’s recommended best web site, it is free and public service web site maintained by its publisher since 1998.  Many, many links to books and articles related to literary criticism are found here.

The Robin Hood Project

http://d.lib.rochester.edu/robin-hood

“The Robin Hood Project is designed to make available a database of texts, images, bibliographies, and basic information about the Robin Hood stories and other outlaw tales. The project is sponsored by the University of Rochester and prepared in The Rossell Hope Robbins Library, a medieval studies library located within Rush Rhees Library.”–from the website.

The Little Red Riding Hood Project

http://www.usm.edu/media/english/fairytales/lrrh/lrrhhome.htm

“Welcome to the Little Red Riding Hood Project, a text and image archive containing sixteen English versions of the fairy tale. The Little Red Riding Hoods presented here represent some of the more common varieties of the tale from the English-speak ing world in the eighteenth, nineteenth, and early twentieth centuries. The materials were drawn from the de Grummond Children’s Literature Research Collectionat the University of Southern Mississippi.”–From the website.

Common Sense Media

http://www.commonsensemedia.org/

Includes a database by the non-profit organization Common Sense Media of reviews on all types of media (movies, books, games, websites, apps, music, and TV) that parents and their children can use to find trustworthy information about all of these kinds of media.

Electronic Literature Organization

http://eliterature.org/about/

“The Electronic Literature Organization was founded in 1999 to foster and promote the reading, writing, teaching, and understanding of literature as it develops and persists in a changing digital environment. A 501c(3) non-profit organization, the ELO includes writers, artists, teachers, scholars, and developers.”–From the website.

Mark Twain Project Online

http://www.marktwainproject.org/

“Mark Twain Project Online applies innovative technology to more than four decades’ worth of archival research by expert editors at the Mark Twain Project.       It offers unfettered, intuitive access to reliable texts, accurate and exhaustive notes, and the most recently discovered letters and documents.  Its ultimate purpose is to produce a digital critical edition, fully annotated, of everything Mark Twain wrote.”–From the websie.

The Paris Review : Author Interviews

http://www.theparisreview.org/interviews

The Paris Review has all of its interveiws with authors available from the 1950’s to the present.

The Innocence Record

https://www.innocencerecord.org/Pages/Home.aspx?ReturnUrl=%2f_layouts%2fAuthenticate.aspx%3fSource%3d%252f&Source=%2f

“The Innocence Record is a collection and collation of available public documents concerning the nearly 300 persons who have been wrongfully convicted and later exonerated through DNA evidence. The circumstances of each exoneree’s wrongful conviction is profiled on the site, along with information concerning the court proceedings and participants. The available and collected public records, as well as case abstracts summarizing key information from those documents are available for the first time in searchable form over the World Wide Web.”–From the Web site.   A searchable database.

Finding titles within Series Lists

www.fantasticfiction.com

This site was introduced by Gina, Humanities Manager:

Probably just about every reference staff member has been asked for the next book in a series.  Or even been asked for a more vague title search.  Not knowing the title is part of a series, sometimes it is difficult to find that book by its title or even by author.

This site lists different series by the author’s last name.  If the author has written more than one series, every title will be listed within that particular series in order of publication date.  There are also pictures of the books’ covers- just in case you’re still not quite sure that is what you’re looking for.

Very user-friendly site with a lot of useful information.

Thanks, Gina!

ipl2 Literary Criticism

www.ipl.org/div/litcrit/guide.html

From the folks at the Internet Public Library, this is a great guide to some of the best online sources for literary criticism.  The guide is divided into three sections, including “Best Starting Places” and “Starting Places for Particular Time Periods.”

Books of the Century

http://booksofthecentury.com/

This website compiles, by year, four different lists of books published during the twentieth century:

  1. The top ten bestsellers in fiction, as recorded by Publishers Weekly.
  2. The top ten bestsellers in nonfiction, also as recorded by Publishers Weekly.
  3. The main selections of the Book-of-the-Month Club, which was founded in 1926.
  4. Critically acclaimed and historically significant books, as identified by consulting various critics’ and historians’ lists of important books.

The Literary Gothic

http://www.litgothic.com/index_fl.html

“The Literary Gothic is a Web guide to all things concerned with literary Gothicism, which includes ghost stories, “classic” Gothic novels and Gothic fiction (1764-1820), and related pre- and post-Gothic and supernaturalist literature written prior to the mid-C20. Its target audience is all students and fans of the Gothic, regardless of age, academic level, profession, or just about anything else.”–From the Web site.   Links to many etexts of gothic works are included.

FREE: Federal Resources for Educational Excellence

http://free.ed.gov/index.cfm

This is a fantastic site that “makes it easier to find teaching and learning resources from the federal government.  More than 1,500 federally supported teaching and learning resources are included from dozens of federal agencies. New sites are added regularly.” 

The site is extremely well-organized and easy to search.  Choose a topic from the subject list and find great information about everything ranging from  scientists, countries of the world, history, and jazz to ethnic studies and literature.

Great Books Index

http://books.mirror.org/gb.titles.html

This site offers links to online English translations of  many of the great books of the world.